Black History: It’s Not Just Our History; It’s American History

Each year, the youth and staff of Louisiana Methodist Children’s Home in Ruston prepare for and present a Black History Program and Celebration which never fails to entertain and educate. This year was no exception! Mr. Joseph Bellamy opened the program by playing the “Black National Anthem” on his saxophone.

Joseph Bellamy playing the Black National Anthem.
Joseph Bellamy playing the Black National Anthem.

Following a warm welcome by Mr. Gary Rambin and an introduction by Ms. Stephanie Hunter, girls from Everett house performed the song “Encourage Yourself.”

A heartfelt tribute to Maya Angelou was led by Mr. Lenard Pruitt and was accompanied by a slide show which highlighted just a few of her many achievements. Maya Angelou was an accomplished author, poet, dancer, actress and singer. Her poem, Still I Rise, served as inspirational material for a skit portion of the program performed by the girls of Harman and Everett houses.

Youth performing during the skit portion of the program.
Youth performing during the skit portion of the program.

Young men from the Reception Center on campus read the poem, “I, Too, Sing America” by Langston Hughes.

Following a remarkable dance and skit representing the, “Journey from Africa to America”, by the Everett, Harman and Reception Center girls, Ms. Kasha Wiley performed the final musical piece of the day, “Precious Lord.”

Rick Wheat, CEO, shared his gratitude for the Celebration and said, “Each year I am impressed by how well our kids and staff sing, dance, act, read, narrate, and creatively express themselves as they lead us in a Celebration of Black History.”